Green Lawns, LLC Keeping Mother Nature At Bay

Our lawn care program is designed to keep Mother Nature at bay.  Nature is continually moving toward a climax forest.  A climax forest is the highest most intense point in the development of a plot of land, evolving toward a forest.  It is where no other plants exist that will outcompete the plants that are currently growing there.  Oak, beech, chestnut and similar hard wood trees are the “end result” plants.  Your lawn is trying to get to that place in time where no other plants will grow. Green Lawns, LLC has a great program to prevent that from happening, basically domesticating your landscape, making it behave.

By providing the appropriate growing conditions for your lawn to exist, we promote a fine, healthy, green, weed free lawn for you.  Each season, your lawn is inundated with weed seeds blowing in from neighbors next door, and even from states away.  Seeds are designed to take to the air.   These traveling seeds fall to the ground in your yard and compete with your lawn.  Often times heading in the direction of that climax forest.  Crabgrass plants are aggressive, outcompeting most turf types. 

Crabgrass grows up and over desirable turfgrass species and when it dies in the fall; you are left with a huge hole in your lawn.  Multiplied by thousands of crabgrass plants, that’s thousands of holes, or one huge hole depending on how you look at it.  Similarly, higher plant species are able to outcompete your turfgrass.  That’s where Green Lawns, LLC comes in to help with controlling the progress towards climax forests, by making timely applications, with properly calibrated equipment, while using the best products on the market; we keep Mother Nature, and her desire to have a climax forest, at bay. 

 What are the appropriate growing conditions?  The answer begins with proper soil, and cultural practices.  Unfortunately, and far too often, newly established residential developments leave the homeowners with subsurface soils, which have been hardened and compacted by equipment almost to the point of concrete.  These conditions prevent turfgrass from establishing and thriving.  The Green Lawns, LLC Turfgrass Maintenance Program will assist you by identifying concerns, and performing proper cultural practices designed to allow your turfgrass to thrive.  Proper watering, mowing, soil amendments, fertility and weed and insect control measures will allow your lawn to produce and thrive to its fullest potential.    

Why have a fine lawn and landscape?  The benefits are extraordinary to the environment as well as to us all.  These benefits include water quality and filtration preventing sedimentation and pollution of nearby waterways; health of the soil by building soil humus from decaying plant parts; temperature modification and heat control by cooling the air through transpiration; clean the air by catching dust and particles as the wind blows; production of oxygen through photosynthesis.  A fine lawn provides a warm, peaceful and inviting feeling for us humans, reducing stress, a fine lawn and garden relaxes us. The University of Minnesota finds that “the physical and social problems often associated with inner cities can, in part, be related to the absence of lawns and other ornamental landscape plantings. When areas are cleaned up and various landscape plantings reintroduced, there is a noted improvement in the physical environment. There is also an increase in neighborhood interaction thereby strengthening the various social relationships and overall community bonding”. 

If you are interested in keeping ole Mother Nature at bay, all you have to do is contact Green Lawns LLC we are here to provide you with a healthy and sustainable landscape.   We are always easy and happy to discuss your lawn and landscape.  Give us a call!  

 Please call us now at 302-674-8850 and visit www.GREENLAWNSSERVICES.COM

Leaves: Renewable Plant Food

I wanted to blog about what to do with your leaves in the fall and even spring cleanups.  Large shade trees with deep root systems bring up minerals and nutrients from deep below the surface.  Fall time, spent leaves deposits these nutrients and minerals back down to the surface. Decomposition  releases these nutrients and minerals back to the plants. These leaves also add organic materials to the soil thus adding humus to the soil, which feed the micro-organizms, earthworms etc, thereby adding more to the soil structure, by building it up.  Composted cow manure, blood meal and similar products will ad additional nitrogen to the mix for plants that require higher amounts of N.

The moral of the story is to shred those leaves, don’t bag them up. Compost them down and feed your gardens.